Fwd: Spotlight on Ava Marsh — Bibliophile Book Club

A short read about researching some taboo topics that makes you think about your own research methods as a writer. Hop over and give it a read.


Ava Marsh's book cover for Untouchable.
Ava Marsh’s book Untouchable.

Today, I am thrilled to have the lovely Ava Marsh joining me on the blog with a brilliant guest post! About Ava: Ava Marsh grew up in Margate, Kent. A former broadsheet journalist, she now works as…

Source: Spotlight on Ava Marsh

 

Looking back over my book Hardboil High: Freshman

Several years ago, almost eight, I spent 2 days in my family’s cabin on the lake writing the next, great American novel. Sounds like a horror film, right?

Well, nothing scary happened, except for a lot of cabin fever. But not that kind of cabin fever.

What I did do was pretty much what I was aiming for… I wrote an entire complete first draft of my novel. Was it perfect? Far from it. Was it there? Yeah. Did I feel like I’d made a mistake? Mostly. Did I have a lot of fun? Absolutely.

Today, I went back and started putting the numbers together, and looking at what I had. I was feeling more positive about my work, and feeling like maybe there was something there to brag about, if I’d just get back on it.

HH-CabinDays
A book by the numbers.

Turns out that a) I wrote more words in 2 days than I remembered, b) I had a higher wordcount than I recalled as well. That definitely left me feeling better about the whole experience.

In the near future, I will probably be revisiting those chapters and rewriting a lot, and adding more. As you can see from the numbers, a lot of my chapters are pretty short. The result of moving so fast through writing. But the bulk of what needs to be there is there, just need to get back in and get my hands dirty. And work on those chapters.

How fast can you write? Do you have a habit of skimming on the narrative when trying to cram writing? What’s the most you’ve ever accomplished over a small amount of time?

This post was originally shared on Google+ here:

I’m feeling pretty good about my writing WRITE NOW

Ever since last Fall, I took on a couple of writing projects. The first was publishing the Josephine the Dragon stories by Taylor Christine on the blog. The second was writing the next installment in the I Will Kill You for $5 project.

But, alas, it felt like I had really fallen behind on the blog and writing in general. Life has been crazy, to my credit. However, as is the case a lot, I dump on myself a lot about writing.

Continue reading “I’m feeling pretty good about my writing WRITE NOW”

About a story and updates

I’ve been awfully quiet on the eastern front lately. Lots of other things have been engulfing my time as of late. But when I can, since October, I’ve been working on a short story for my good friend Jessica Wright. It was part of my I Will Kill You for $5 project, but I was giving it away as a thank you for her and her boyfriend helping out with recording my first ever comedy gig. Well, what should have been a quick short story, has been getting longer and longer, and more complex as I go. Continue reading “About a story and updates”

NaNoWriMo 2015, I Will Kill You for $5 project – Volume 1

So, I decided (rather last minute as usual) to take part in this NaNoWriMo charade once more. I’ve never “won” or completed the 50k minimum, but it is a most helpful way to push yourself to prioritize a project for a month even if you don’t complete that many words.

This year I’ve decided to take my I Will Kill You for $5 project and compile the works I’ve done thus far, and hopefully 5 new ones, into a single volume for NaNo this year. Continue reading “NaNoWriMo 2015, I Will Kill You for $5 project – Volume 1”

On Writing image

On Writing (Part 5): Have more than one Good Idea per Story

(originally shared on Ello)

When I was younger, I used to think one solid or good idea was enough to carry a story. With time, I learned that to be very, very false. Having one good idea is not enough to carry a story. For example, Hitchcock’s film Saboteur ends with a climactic action scene atop the Statue of Liberty. Now, imagine if everything leading up to that was a series of lame ideas leading into that one good idea. Now, you see the point. Continue reading “On Writing (Part 5): Have more than one Good Idea per Story”

How do writers cope with rejection?

Writers receive a great deal of rejection in life. All writers are convinced their stories are the cotton candy of carnival desires. That their stories are so savory and sweet that they melt on your tongue when devoured. And why not? Writers bleed words into sentences, into paragraphs, into chapters, into sections, into parts, into books, into series of books. After hours, days, weeks, months, years of slaving away at the story, they don’t want to submit stories and have them unceremoniously rejected. In the least someone could make a big deal out of it, but nope. Just. Rejection. Continue reading “How do writers cope with rejection?”