Knock, Knock… Issue 6 Submission Call!

SUBMISSION CALL for dark writers.

Massacre Publishing

KeyholeWe want you to take us through the keyhole…

Just what is it about that place at the end of the road? Is everything as it seems? What lurks within…or beneath?

We are looking for stories that trespass into new territory. From the dream house than becomes a nightmare, the ‘project’ that hides secrets within its walls, to high-rises with a view to die for and urban explorations that descend into danger – send us your undesirable residence.

scary house 1The deadline for ‘keyhole’ themed fiction and dark verse is March 15th, 2015 (midnight, GMT).

Word count for fiction: 500 – 10,000.

We suggest you read an issue of Massacre to see just what grabs us around the throat.

In the subject line of your email please put: KEYHOLE/YOUR NAME/TITLE OF YOUR WORK. For complete terms and guidelines click HERE.

Publication

We aim to release Massacre 6 in April…

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Hridoypur**

Dipankar’s work of translating these poems into English is much appreciated. This latest addition is completely fantastic. Love the rhythm and wording. Highly recommended reading, if you love reading poetry.

You’ll need to click-through to the original post to read the poem.

A Kaleidoscope World

This version: December 31, 2014

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Translation-cum-transcreation of a classic Bengali poem হৃদয়পুর (Hridoypur) by Shakti Chattopadhyay. The poem was published in his collection entitled ধর্মে আছো জিরাফেও আছ (dhorme aachho giraffe-eo achho, meaning, you exist in religion as well as in the giraffe) around the year 1977.

**For those unfamiliar with the Bengali language, the word “hridoy” means heart. The word “pur” means a locality. It’s a common suffix carried by a number of large as well as small towns and villages in India, such as Nagpur, Kanpur and so on. Hridoypur could mean a geographical territory, and indeed a locality by that name exists, but in the present context, the word “hridoy” (heart) lends to it a poetic connotation.





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Perennial Favorites: Unrestricted vs. Controlled Comments

Good conversation about controlled and monitored comments.

The Daily Post

Many of you commented on a recent post that focused on ways to respond to critical feedback left on your blog. We thought you might find this post from our archives equally useful, as it offers a more detailed look into your blog’s discussion settings.

Do you want readers to interact with your blog, but wonder how much control to exercise over their input? Here are some options to consider.

Comment approval: the pros and cons of instant gratification

As a blogger, are you a control freak or a free spirit? Either way, If you’ve enabled comments on your blog, you can choose how much authority to exercise over the comments appearing on your posts.

Screen shot 2013-07-23 at 11.22.50 AM

One of the most fundamental questions to address is whether you should first approve a comment before it appears on your blog (to change your choice, go to Settings → Discussion in your dashboard).

  • Leave…

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The Missourian, Chapter 1

Chapter One
All three of the McKay boys were out tending the ranch, as was there custom, when they received the news. Their little sister, Johanna, came running out to them from the woods that stood between the field they were in and the homestead.  She was badly beaten and her clothes were torn, she was trying to keep a shawl across her torn dress as she limped along.  She raised her hands, letting go of the shawl and screeched, “They’re killin’ us!”  
 
And that was all she got out.
 
A rider, his face hidden behind a yellow bandanna, came riding out of the woods and shot her quick in the back of the head.  The bullet came straight through the nose and whisked by the boys.  She flailed forward with her arms drawn upward and collapsed to the ground as dead weight.  The rider stopped and looked on the boys for a moment, then reared his black stallion back and galloped back into the woods and towards the house.

Continue reading “The Missourian, Chapter 1”

Longer than a 7 year itch

Every now and again I get this itch to become a stand-up comedian. It usually results in me trying to develop some material, and I usually end up being frustrated in the end. Here is one such piece…
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Nathan Weaver

I was thinking… we Americans are pretty full of ourselves. I mean, what other country would dare have a magazine titled Self? I’m thinking I’ll start a new magazine called Someone Else, and it will be filled with interviews of people you can’t relate to and articles on topics that are irrelevant to you. So, it’ll be like an adult reading a teen magazine.